21 January 2006 @ 02:59 pm
Linux ads on KLBJ?  
This is cool. Some Linux advocates are putting together a grassroots ad campaign and plan to start airing ads on KLBJ (590 AM)...

Lobby4Linux, in cooperation with myfirstlinux.com and featuring PclinuxOS; announce the first commercial advertising effort for the Linux Operating System. We will advertise a free system, not the boxed-sets for SUSE or RedHat you see on CompUSA shelves. The residents of Austin Texas will soon hear of Linux on their radio stations. For six days a week, two to three times a day and for 24 days, Linux will become a “known” product via a professional 30 second radio advertisement. According to hundreds of responses to a recent Lobby4Linux blog of helios, it is an effort well past its time.

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( 3 comments — Comment )
Mad Wanganarchetic on January 22nd, 2006 05:00 pm (UTC)
Miserable sinner than I am, I just installed Win2K on this machine. I played with {U,Xu,Ku}buntu, but really, neither GNOME nor KDE seem to offer quite the same level of responsiveness as 'doze, at least on this box (750Mhz Athlon, 128Mb RAM.) Plus, OpenOffice is joke .. I think people who write software in Java should be forced to pay for the extra CO2 emissions generated by the CPUs required to run it. Abiword is tolerable, as was running the old 16bit version of MS Money under Wine, but really, I couldn't find an excuse to ditch Windows. I may play with QEMU at later date, though .. I'm still curious about trying EROS / CapROS.
nationElectricnationelectric on January 23rd, 2006 09:19 am (UTC)
I'm a pretty big believer in portability, so I do a looot of stuff with Java and XML. That said, I generally consider both linux and java to be best-suited for server applications. Or, more specifically, to be generally ill-advised for desktop/productivity applications. OpenOffice can be decent -- hell, I wrote a 50,000 word novel in it -- but, yeah, it does like to munch those cycles. Yeah, portability costs. I use protégé off and on these days, and I love it, but I so dearly hate it. The app is great, but running anything that big in java -- particularly on OS X -- is agony.

Well, not quite agony. But not-goodness, anyway.

But, yeah, linux. God, I haven't run desktop linux in ages. I eventually quit when I realized that all I was doing with my linux machine was running linux. Not writing software or anything, just installing packages & patches, fucking around with the system, etc. Seriously, it sucked up all of my time. And it was cool, it was a lot of fun when it wasn't infuriating, but it was all I did.

Personally, my favorite arrangement was to run enlightenment with no desktop manager. Plenty of eye candy, but the bloat was mitigated by the lack of the dm -- which really was kinda extraneous, anyway. Set it up with 9 desktops, a copy of firefox (or, at the time, galleon), a decent term program, a few useful widgets, and a system menu bound to button3, and you have a surprisingly flexible, lean, attractive, ergonomic system. And configurable as hell. But that was before e became the holy grail of paradigm-redefining window manager vaporware. Or rather, it was before it became a total farce.

Still, you could probably run DR16 pretty reasonably on that machine...

NO! No, don't listen to me.

Mmmm.... nostalgia.........
Mad Wanganarchetic on January 23rd, 2006 10:10 am (UTC)
But, yeah, linux. God, I haven't run desktop linux in ages. I eventually quit when I realized that all I was doing with my linux machine was running linux. Not writing software or anything, just installing packages & patches, fucking around with the system, etc.

Heh, yeah .. I realised that a couple of years ago. I think it's sign of developing maturity .. or perhaps cynicism?

Personally, my favorite arrangement was to run enlightenment with no desktop manager. ... But that was before e became the holy grail of paradigm-redefining window manager vaporware.

*snigger* Do you remember back in '97 / '98 how astonishing it looked, compared to anything else around at the time? I guess that was the start of the whole 'skinning' craze. Personally, I settled down with WindowMaker fairly early on: reasonably pretty, reasonably but not excessively configurable, and a dock for snapping clocks and system monitors into. Basically an elaborate way of tiling xterms, which is all a wm should be anyway ;-)
( 3 comments — Comment )